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Great LEXpectations

By Alan Kilpatrick

Our colleagues at the Law Society of Manitoba Library recently launched a new blog called Great LEXpectations. It is written and maintained by the Law Society of Manitoba’s Librarian, Karen Sawatzky, and Library Assistant, Stafany Shirley, with new posts every week or two.

On Great LEXpectations, you will find research tips, resources, and news of interest to members of the Manitoba legal profession. Some recent posts include:

• Welcome vLex
• A Sign of the Times
• Free Mandatory Minimum Sentence Monitoring Website

As the Legal Sourcery team has indicated in the past, coming up with a good blog name can be difficult. The About GreatLEXpectations page describes how their blog name was created:

Great LEXpectations is a play on words of the Dickens novel, Great Expectations, and lex, the latin word for law. The library for the Law Society of Manitoba and the legal profession, is called the Great Library, thus the mashup of “Great LEXpectations”.

We look forward to following Great LEXpectations! You can find it online at lawlibrary.ca.

(Reposted from Legal Sourcery)

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Saskatchewan Access to Legal Information Project Conference

By Alan Kilpatrick

I had the opportunity to represent the Saskatchewan Library Association recently at the Saskatchewan Access to Legal Information Project (SALI) Conference.

The SALI conference took place on October 20-21 at the University of Saskatchewan: The Role of Legal Information Providers and Public Libraries in Promoting Access to Justice. The conference brought together representatives from every library region in the province, justice industry stakeholders, and a variety of community organizations to discuss how to increase and improve access to justice and legal information for Saskatchewan’s residents. SALI was first created in 2016 out of the recognition that gaps exist in the public’s access to basic legal information. You can learn more about SALI’s creation here.

The exciting conference featured an action oriented agenda, a variety of diverse panels, and plenty of opportunity for small group discussion:

• Panel 1: Welcome and Opening Remarks
• Panel 2: Reflections on Data Collection in Public Libraries and Legal Information Needs
• Keynote 1: Legal Information, Legal Advice, and Access to Justice
• Panel 3: Accessing Legal Information Resources
• Panel 4: Recognizing Context: Diverse and Overlapping Needs in Rural, Remote, and Urban Centres
• Keynote 2: Accessing Resources and Developing Collections Lists
• Keynote 3: Ongoing Partnerships Model and Moving Forward

Those who missed the conference can still watch the recorded livestream by contacting Katie Riley by email (katie.riley@usask.ca).

Legal Information Innovation in Saskatchewan

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library’s ground-breaking efforts to improve access to legal information and justice were recently featured in Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research. This peer-reviewed journal is the official publication of the Partnership, a national network of Canada’s provincial library associations.

The article, “Legal Information Innovation in Saskatchewan”, explores the work libraries are doing to innovative access to justice.  We encourage you to read the article and share it widely among your colleagues.

Abstract
Access to legal information enables people to identify the full range of legal options available to them. In some cases, access to legal information allows people to resolve legal problems outside the court system altogether. Unfortunately, access to legal information in Canada has been described as poor. At the Law Society of Saskatchewan Library, we have been exploring the role libraries can play in improving access to legal information. Over the past three years, we have participated in a multitude of legal information initiatives with justice, community, and library stakeholders. I am here to tell you about these initiatives and what we have learned about promoting access to legal information in a library setting. This article is adapted from presentations given at the 2017 Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference and the 2017 Saskatchewan Library Association Conference.

Suggested Citation

Kilpatrick, A. (2017). “Legal Information Innovation in Saskatchewan”. Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 12(1).

 

Ordinances of the Northwest Territories

By Alan Kilpatrick

Saskatchewan, or the area that now makes up Saskatchewan, was part of the Northwest Territories before it became a province.  The Ordinances of the Northwest Territories helped form Saskatchewan’s laws when the province was created in 1905.  Where can you locate these Ordinances?

The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library carries a complete print set of the Ordinances of the Northwest Territories.  Additionally, the Alberta Heritage Digitization Project has scanned and digitized all of the Ordinances from 1877 to 1905 and made them freely available on their website.  They can be found online at: http://www.ourfutureourpast.ca/law/browse.aspx.

It can be difficult to trace particular sections of the Ordinances.  If you require any assistance researching the Ordinances, please contact a Law Society Librarian.

Source

Alberta Heritage Digitization Project. (2010). About the Alberta Law Collection. Retrieved from www.ourfutureourpast.ca/law/about.html

(Reposted from Legal Sourcery)

Subscribe to HeinOnline’s Blog!

By Alan Kilpatrick

HeinOnline is a popular full-text journal database available in the Law Society of Saskatchewan Library’s Members’ Section.

Did you know that HeinOnline has an excellent blog?  Here are some recent research tips from their blog:

• Five Things You Can Do in Less Than 15 Seconds in HeinOnline
• Primary Sources, Secondary Sources and Beyond
• Comprehensive Search Results in HeinOnline Just Got Better
• Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals: Did You Know…?
• HeinOnline: Where Books Rule

We encourage you to consider subscribing to HeinOnline’s blog!

(Reposted from Legal Sourcery)

Free Legal Resource Fair During Saskatchewan’s Second Annual Access to Justice Week

By Alan Kilpatrick

On October 19th, the Saskatoon Public Library’s Francis Morrison Central Library Branch hosted a Free Legal Resource Fair in recognition of Saskatchewan’s Second Annual Access to Justice Week.

During the busy come-and-go tradeshow, members of the public had the opportunity to learn about their legal rights and connect with a variety of non-profit, government, and community legal service providers in Saskatoon.  The fair’s participants included the Saskatoon Open Door Society, Saskatoon Polices Services, Community Legal Assistance Services for Saskatoon Inner City, Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan, Law Society of Saskatchewan Library, Government of Saskatchewan’s Family Law Information Centre, Saskatchewan Office of Workers’ Advocates, and the Pro Bono Student University of Saskatchewan Chapters.

Volunteer lawyers from the Family Law Information Centre and Pro Bono Law Saskatchewan offered free legal information drop-in sessions for members of the public requiring family law assistance.  Members of the public were entitled to up to 30 minutes to ask questions about family law relevant to their situation

The Free Legal Resource Fair coincided with an enlightening lecture sponsored by McKercher LLP in the Francis Morrison Branch’s Film Theatre: How can your library help you access legal information?  Janet Freeman, a law librarian from the British Columbia LawMatters program, spoke about how public libraries can connect the public with legal information and can fill gap in access to legal information, education, and referrals.

Thank you to the organizations and partners who helped make the fair a real success!

(Reposted from Legal Sourcery)

CBA Toolkits and Practice Tools

By Alan Kilpatrick

Did you know that the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) website provides a wealth of free practice resources?  We encourage you to check it out!

Here is a break down of the amazing resources provided by the CBA:

• Practice Tools: CBA’s Practice Tools feature a broad selection of online guides covering child rights, tax law, and legal ethics.  For example, check out the Child Rights Toolkit.

• Practice Link: CBA’s Practice Links focus on work/life balance, mental health, and networking skills for legal professionals.  For example, check out Got Stress? What to Do Before the Burnout Hits.

• Sections and Forums:CBA features over thirty sections that explore and develop resources for specific areas of the law.  For example, check out the Aboriginal Law Section.

(Reposted from Legal Sourcery)